Migrants Are Committing Crimes So They Won’t Be Deported

  • The migrants will commit crimes right before the deportation process so they slow down the deportation process and will stay in the country.
  • The Interior Minister of Germany is in the process of trying to speed up the deportation process.
  • There are still 51,000 migrants who are still living in Germany, with no reason preventing them from going home.
  • The Interior Minister hopes that they will be able to deport a rough 100,000 migrants from Germany.

Germany’s Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere has lifted the lid on the perverse logic of some migrants who commit crimes so they won’t be deported — because they know the court system will keep them in Europe.

The interior minister — who is a fellow member of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s Christian Democrat Party which is the leading force in the governing German coalition — made the remarks yesterday, reports HuffingtonPost.de.

The comments came as he called to speed up the deportations of migrants who had lodged spurious asylum claims. Mr. de Maiziere said: “[migrants] shortly before deportation… commit an offence with the intention of being brought before a German judge [which would] delay [them] being deported”.

The interior minister also bemoaned the slow process of repatriating migrants away from Germany, and the lack of resources devoted to the process by his government. Criticising “sluggish” systems, Mr. de Maiziere said the individual German states who were responsible for deportations have “little political will to apply the residence law”.

Germany’s Deutsche Welle reports the latest migration figures used by Mr. de Maiziere to illustrate his point, which show there are now 219,000 migrants who are to be deported from Germany. Yet of them some 168,000 can’t be deported because of “obstacles” — in most cases meaning they are from countries that the German government considers unsafe.

The remaining 51,000 for whom there were no official reasons to prevent their being sent home were still living in Germany in great numbers, said Mr. de Maiziere, because of bureaucratic inertia.

Showing his skill for the political euphemism, de Maiziere suggested one of the reasons for there having been so few successful deportations was “insufficient cooperation from the deportees”— meaning t going off the radar and evading authorities once being informed of their expected departure.

Despite this, the interior minister said he hopes for migrants leaving of their own free will to increase this year, to as high as 61,000. In total, he anticipates that Germany could deport 100,000 of the estimated two million “foreigners” who arrived in the country in 2015.

Source: Breitbart

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