The 2020 Presidential Election Calendar At a Glance [With Dates]

Looking for an overview of the 2020 Presidential Election Calendar? Then you’re in the right place. This article will cover the key dates in the next U.S. election cycle and why they matter.

First Caucus in Iowa (Feb. 3)

The 2020 Presidential Election Calendar At a Glance [With Dates]

The first caucus occurs on February 3 in Iowa. Caucuses and primaries determine the party candidates who will run for President. Many analysts believe this caucus is very important because it sets the tempo or direction for voting in future caucuses and primaries.

This will be the first data we receive who on might be the nominees for the Presidential race.

First Primary in New Hampshire (Feb. 11)

The first primary takes place on February 11 in New Hampshire. There are similar feelings about this primary. Outcomes in New Hampshire may set the tone or direction for future primaries.

It’s common for election campaigns to put special emphasis on these two events to ensure their candidates are on the public’s radar.

Super Tuesday (Mar. 3)

There will be primaries and caucuses between February 3 and June 6, but some days will be more noteworthy than others. The day with the most primaries is March 3. On this day, 14 states will vote for their Democratic and Republican nominees.

Key states will participate, including California, Texas, Virginia, North Carolina, and more. While there are still other primaries, this day often gives the public a good idea of who the nominees will be.

Democratic Convention (Jul. 13-16)

From July 13 to July 16, The Democratic Convention will be held in Milwaukee, Wisconsin at the Fiserv Forum.

During this time, The Democratic Party will officially select the party’s nominees for President and Vice President in the 2020 Presidential election. The convention’s format has delegates and superdelegates who will vote on nominees for the Presidential race.

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Primaries and caucuses determine who delegates will vote for at the convention. Superdelegates are unpledged voters chosen by the Democratic Party. Superdelegates make up about 15% of all delegates present at the convention.

After the convention, the public will know who’s on the Democrat ticket.

2016 Democratic Convention

Balloons fall from the ceiling as Hillary Clinton is announced as the party’s nominee in 2016.

Republican Convention (Aug. 24-27)

From August 24 to August 27, The Republican Convention will be held in Charlotte, North Carolina at the Spectrum Center. During this time, The Republican Party will officially select the party’s nominees for President and Vice President in the 2020 Presidential election. It’s traditional for the party occupying the White House to hold their convention last.

The format has delegates vote on a presidential nominee. Primaries or caucuses choose their delegates. However, they do not vote on a Vice President. Instead, the Presidential candidate nominates a Vice President.  After the convention, the public will know who’s on the Republican ticket.

2016 Republican Convention

A look inside the 2016 Republican Convention.

The 2020 Presidential Election (Nov. 3)

November 3rd is the big day. This is when the United States will vote on which nominees will sit in the White House. Voting will last most of the day, with different facilities and states closing at certain times. States will tally their votes then declare a winner the same day. The winner of that state earns all of the state’s electors.

There are 538 in total and it requires at least 270 in order to win.  By November 4, you will know who the President and Vice President will be for the next four years in the United States.

Noteworthy Points

Historically speaking, elections favor a sitting president. Most analysts and new outlets believe that current President Donald Trump will be the Republican nominee. However, that has not stopped a few Republican challengers from throwing their hat in the ring.

On the left it is a much more crowded field. A field that started with over 20 Democrats has dwindled some but still has more than a few familiar names, including:

  • Joe Biden
  • Bernie Sanders
  • Elizabeth Warren
  • Robert O’Rourke
  • Cory Booker
  • Pete Buttigieg
  • Julian Castro
  • Tulsi Gabbard
  • Kamala Harris

To say there is a lot to still be decided is an understatement, but this is for sure to be a wild ride. Keep your eyes on the news as more information comes out. Like any election year, it’s bound to be interesting.

Comments

  1. Fernando Melendez

    The future of our country is at stake. The democrats have gone off the deep end with their LEFTIST agenda, and anyone who cares about our country and what we have stood for as a nation since its founding; should stand with conservatives and vote REPUBLICAN all the way next November.

  2. lillian

    looking forward to voting and ending the democrat circus

  3. lillian

    looking forward to voting and ending the democrat circus

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